Friday, March 31, 2006

Swan - Kensner

This is Gregory Kensner's Swan that was published in Robert Harbin's Origami 4 (1977). The book is very rare, and I don't have an original copy. Instead, I was able to purchase (quite inexpensively) a Hebrew copy from an online book retailer in Israel. There are over a hundred models in the book, and although the diagrams can be difficult to make out at times, it's still possible to fold from them without any English text (I don't know Hebrew).

The swan is curious for its time, because it doesn't use any kind of a traditional base, which was rare for birds back then. I really like the fin-like wings, and the strong sturdy frame. This model holds its shape well, and perches nicely.

The model is folded from a standard 15cm x 15cm single sheet of Origami paper, manufactured by The Japanese Paper Place in Toronto, ON, Canada.

As you can see from the photos, the paper gets quite thick when folding the head, but I think if you're strong enough to fold it without tearing or buckling too much, it's worth sticking with the 15cm square rather than going larger.

Thursday, March 30, 2006

Gorilla - Kawahata

This is the Gorilla from Fumiaki Kawahata's Origami Sekai no Yasei Dobutsu (Wild Animals of the World) published in 1996. Even though the book is in Japanese, the diagrams are excellently drawn, making text unnecessary.

Pretty much all of the detail in the folding is in the head. It uses sort of two mini half-prelimary bases, one on top of each other. The top corner of the smaller half-preliminary base makes the nose.

I find I can never quite get the arms right, as they're sort of an unusal rabbit-ear motion, but this is my best attempt.

I find if I get the angle right for the squash fold on the top of his head, it makes it look like he has shadows where his eyes should be, giving him an interesting expression.

The model is folded from a standard 15cm x 15cm single sheet of Origami paper, manufactured by The Japanese Paper Place in Toronto, ON, Canada. Because the model makes very good use of the regions on the paper, it ends up being a very large model.

Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Camels - Montroll

These are two camels I folded from John Montroll's Origami Sculptures.

The Dromedary camel (one-humped) seems to have more folds, but is actually easier than the Bactrian camel (two-humped). That's because there is a challenging crimp fold used to make the two humps cleanly and close the model back up again.

The heads of the camels are identically folded in both models.

If you look closely, you can see the heads even include eyes under the brow.


The models are each folded from a standard 15cm x 15cm single sheet of Origami paper, manufactured by The Japanese Paper Place in Toronto, ON, Canada.